Notre Dame women's basketball: Florida guard Risch commits to Irish

Anthony Anderson
Tribune Correspondent
Emma Risch of Florida has made a verbal commitment to Notre Dame.

Emma Risch has announced her verbal commitment to Notre Dame women’s basketball class of 2023.

Risch, a 6-foot-1 guard from Melbourne, Fla., is the No. 54-ranked player by ESPN among current high school juniors.

“After considering a lot of great options I have decided to further my athletic and academic career at the University of Notre Dame!” Risch shared via Twitter on Sunday evening. “Thank you Coach Niele Ivey and Notre Dame WBB for this opportunity and believing in me!”

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Risch, per information from maxpreps.com, averaged a team-high 17.8 points, along with 5.3 rebounds, 3.2 assists and 3.0 assists, last season while teaming with then-senior Mikyla Tolivert to lead Palm Bay Magnet High School to Class 5A state runner-up honors in Florida.

Tolivert was Florida’s Miss Basketball and is now at Georgia State. She averaged 17.3 points, and topped the Pirates (23-4) in rebounds (5.6), assists (4.8) and steals (4.9).

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Risch made 88-of-228 on 3-pointers for 38.6% to go with 53.7% on 2-pointers and 86.8% at the line.

“Agile guard brings size to the backcourt and efficient offensive firepower,” ESPN girls basketball talent evaluator Dan Olson wrote in a December 2019 report on Risch.

Emma Risch is a 2023 verbal commitment for Notre Dame women's basketball.

"Quick off the bounce, attacks the defense and finishes plays in traffic. Super jump shooter that yields results.”

Last week, Notre Dame signed guard KK Bransford, ranked No. 29 by ESPN and No. 20 by Prospects Nation in the Class of 2022, with Ivey indicating that the reigning Ohio Ms. Basketball might wind up the lone signee from that class.

At the moment, the Irish are carrying just 10 scholarship players. The NCAA allows up to 15.